September 6, 2011

Sample Making Informed Decisions

Making Informed Decisions

Making informed decision can be regarded as the cognitive development; which is resulting to making choices of various courses of action; among numbers of alternative situations. Every decision making process always ends up with final outcome. And, humans’ performances in decision makings have been the center of continuous research by various analysts and researchers. In order to arrive with an informed decision, one must analyze and examine his or her environment, situation, and the impact of whatever results it may cause to the decision maker. Several perspectives should be given extra thoughts and considerations based on a set of needs, preferences and values which an individual seeks for prior to his or her decision making. From a cognitive perspective, decision making process must be considered as a continuous process involved in the interaction of human beings to their environment. On the other hand, from a normative view, individual’s decisions is associated with the logic decision making ability and rationality of him or her that will help the person to come up with various choices, that later on will require the individual; to make a final choice. (http://www.herc.org/hercarticles/informed.htm)

Furthermore, making informed decision may be regarded as a problem solving test which will determine the individual’s most acceptable solution to the scenario. Thus, informed decision making is a process of reasoning or emotional rationality or irrationality; it’s depending on the explicit assumptions of the decision maker. However, bear in mind that most decisions are unconsciously made. According to Jim Nightingale, who wrote the “Think Smart-Act Smart,” said that many people just decide on anything without proper thinking much about the decision process that might affect many aspects of their lives. More often, people have fewer tendencies to weigh the pros and cons before making a decision on a regular basis. Correspondingly, logical decision making ability is very crucial in all science-based professions. In the field of science, many specialists are required to apply their knowledge in a given field in order to make appropriate informed decisions. For instance, medical decision making mostly requires an accurate diagnosis; as well as determining the appropriate treatment of the disease. For some cases, some people use naturalistic methods, based on their intuition ability; instead of structured approaches. However, with the recognition primed decision making, approaches of setting indicators to the scenario, are the main bases of how the doctors will make their final decision. Based on their long-term experiences in the medical field, most physicians can arrive quickly with satisfactory course of action, without considering any options.

(http://www.metiri.com/PDFs/MetiriSDP.pdf)

But, in few cases, robust decision brings uncertainty to other people’s decision making process. Thus, a main part of decision making must involve the analysis of a limited set of options; based on some evaluative criteria. All these criteria should be found attractive by the decision makers. Then it’s up to them whether to find the best alternative solution at the end of the line. Relatively, solving issues like these, needs a lot of decisiveness. And, there are two kinds of determining which right decision must be chosen in making informed decision. First, the Multi-Criteria Decision Analysis or MCDA; and the other one is the Multi-Criteria Decision Making or MCDM. In this regard, it is very important to differentiate the difference between problem analysis and decision making. The idea is completely different from one another. The problem analysis must be done before arriving with decision making. In making informed decision, objectives must be first recognized. And, they must be classified, and then place in order of significance. Similarly, take alternative actions in developing decisions; and alternatives must compliment to the objectives of the tentative decision. The tentative decision must be assessed for more possible consequences. Whatever decision made, it must be taken immediately, to see possible results.

(http://www.pbs.org/now/classroom/lessonplan-07.html)

Isabel Briggs Myers, a behavioralist; believes that a person’s decision making process greatly depends on the significant level of his or her cognitive responses such as thinking and feeling, extroversion and introversion, judgment and perception; as well as sensing and intuition. Different studies suggests that cross cultural differences among societies in the world, shows a unique style of decision making process among groups of individuals. Primarily, there are four stages involved in group decision making process. The orientation stage, this is where members meet each other for the first time. Then, conflict stage, in these stage members is already having disputes and issues among each other, once they have become already familiar with each other. After that, there is emergence stage, wherein the group starts to clear up and settle disputes and issues among each other through open forum. Finally, reinforcement stage, wherein members come up with common decision, after deliberations.

(http://www.pbs.org/now/classroom/lessonplan-07.html)

References:

(http://www.herc.org/hercarticles/informed.htm)

(http://www.metiri.com/PDFs/MetiriSDP.pdf)

(http://www.pbs.org/now/classroom/lessonplan-07.html)

(http://www.pbs.org/now/classroom/lessonplan-07.html)

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